Eva Carlston Academy
Posted on:

Growing Acceptance of Mental Health Treatment

Mental illnesses have seen a steady increase over the years and it only seems to be progressing. Anxiety disorders affect 25% of children between the ages of 13 to 18 years old and are at higher risk to perform poorly at school or engage in substance abuse. The evidence is overwhelming, and it’s becoming harder to ignore the harmful stigmas and discrimination that surround mental health and mental health treatment. 

Mental Health Crisis

Though anxiety and depression may be the most common mental illness diagnosed amongst young adults, it is not the only one that exists. An estimated amount of 44 million Americans currently suffer from a mental illness. This ranges anywhere from Bipolar Disorder, Borderline Personality Disorder, Depression, Anxiety, Dissociative Identity Disorder and so much more. 48,000 people die every year by suicide and what drives someone to this point could be many things, not just depression. By observing all the facts and fiction that surrounds mental illnesses, we can start to truly become more aware and better equipped to help others. 

With COVID-19, more people have become isolated or experienced a stressful life event which has had a devastating effect on anxiety and depression disorders in young adults. In 2019, 11% of young adults reported suffering from anxiety or depression. In 2020, it rose to a staggering 41%. It’s important now more than ever to break down the barriers of harmful judgments place on mental illnesses and seeking help. 

Breaking Stigmas and Raising Awareness

The stigmas surrounding mental illnesses are dangerous and potentially life-threatening. Those who are suicidal and isolate often may be refusing treatment due to the harshly perceived judgment of their peers. It can become their inside voice and reality that it is embarrassing or shameful to seek help. It is said that 60% of American that has a mental illness do not seek treatment and 9 out of 10 people have stated that stigmas and discrimination have had a negative effect on their life. 

Harmful stigmas can stop someone from seeking the help that they truly need and thus become stuck in a circle of negativity from society, friends, family, and others. Understanding that depression, PTSD, OCD, BPD, and numerous other mental illnesses don’t just go away without the guidance and help of a professional is the first step in taking down the barriers put up by false assumptions. Mental illnesses can affect anyone at any time. 

Struggling with your mental health is something that you should never be ashamed of. Getting the help you deserve and need is normal and okay. At Eva Carlston Academy we strongly encourage our students to explore different methods of releasing the built-up pressures that come with mental illnesses. The harmful stigmas, judgements, and assumptions that follow being diagnosed with a mental illness does not define you and no matter where you come from, it is always okay to help yourself. Whether it be art therapy, talk therapy, or group counseling, your solution is out there and you are not alone. 

1 comment

  1. Jamie L says:

    Thank you, Eva Carlston Academy, for posting this. As society progresses it seems like mental health is becoming more and more of a topic people are discussing and acknowledging. It’s something we need to continue talking about!

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *